Straight Talk With Nick

Good afternoon!

Happy Friday!

I was going to publish this on Sunday morning but you need something to read.

A once a month email newsletter where I’ll write about anything that’s on my mind.

If you have any comments, it’s faster to tweet them at me (here’s my Twitter handle: @nickhtang) because I have to approve each comment when you post them on my website. It’s only then I can reply to you.

There’s two topics I want to write about today.

Mindset.

And CX (customer experience) in the retail industry, with a focus on how they respond to their existing and potential new customers on Twitter.

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CX (Customer Experience)

If you’ve been following me on Twitter (@nickhtang), you know I’m a fitness fanatic. My second home is the gym. Because I loved being pushed beyond my comfort zone by my instructors and personal trainers (I recommend them. You should contact them to see if they can help you reach your fitness goals)
Coach Paula
Coach Vince
Coach Matt and
Coach Functional Badass

Naturally, I’m picky when it comes to fitness shirts, socks and shorts. Why? I need clothing that can wick away my sweat during my workouts (I hate it when sweat clings to my back and shirt during my workouts).

And I used to wear inferior fitness gear: cotton shirts. Cotton socks. Target’s C6. Eddie Bauer. UnderArmour. Gear that didn’t work for me.

So when Coach Functional Badass introduced me to Lululemon (yes, I’m an official Lululemon fan), my first thought? Why not? None of the other gear has been working for me. What do I have to lose (notice my mindset? I didn’t think cost. I focused on function). The minute I walked into the Lululemon Bayshore Shopping Centre store? What an amazing CX experience. Friendly, knowledgeable ambassadors. Positive, friendly store vibe.

After I bought their fitness shirts, shorts and socks (the sweat doesn’t cling to my back and shirts during my workouts. My feet aren’t sweaty after I take off my shoes. My shorts? What can I write? They’re amazing), I started updating my business and casual clothes wardrobe (bye bye Banana Republic. Bye bye Eddie Bauer. Bye bye Mountain Warehouse. Hello Lululemon long and short sleeves slim fit shifts. Hello Lululemon slim and casual fit pants. Hello Lululemon socks).

And, it’s true.

You are what you wear. When I wear my Lululemon clothes, I feel like a billion dollars. My attitude in the gym and the world changes. I’m more confident. I feel I can accomplish anything I put my mind to. My day? It got a billon times better.

When I noticed the company had a Twitter account? I started tweeting questions to them. Like this one:

Within the hour, I had an answer (guess who got the sale? Hint. It wasn’t Eddie Bauer). Was there any response from the Eddie Bauer social media team? No (what a wasted opportunity).

The CX lesson to the retail world?

Your customers are judging your social media presence and response. If a past or future customer includes you in a tweet, for goodness sake, acknowledge their tweet. Say “[h]ey, before you visit X, did you know we have Y that solves your problem?”

I’ll take it one further. Before I buy anything, I’ll take a look at the company’s Twitter feed. To see how passionate their fans are (are they showing any love to the company? Gushing about their products?). And to see if they making a personal attempt to answer their customers questions (you can tell when the social media team is cutting and pasting the same tweets over and over again. Or they haven’t tweeted or replied to their customers tweets in over a month).

Mindset

Now, let’s switch to mindset.

Two examples for you to consider:

A) did you see the photo of the umbrella (it’s not a sponsored post by the way)?

How much did it cost?

$10? $5? $20?

How about $80 (Canadian; this isn’t the sale price. It’s the full price).

A lot of you are thinking (no, literally screaming at me right saying  “are you out of your freakin mind?!?! Who pays $80 for an umbrella? My $10 one works just fine”)

Ok. I get it. You’re happy with your $10 umbrella. The one that breaks during the next windy rain storm when you least expect it. Or turns inside out once the wind hits it. The one whose arms break the minute you open it (and you have to trash it. Literally).

Me? I used to be like that (scarcity mentality). Figuring that I’m saving a lot of money by buying cheap umbrellas (that’s why it’s cheap. So you can buy another one. Again. And again. And again. It’s similar to people who think that they’ll save money by cutting back on their daily venti Starbucks coffee instead of thinking of the big wins. Changing jobs to get a bigger salary. Negotiating with your insurance company to get a cheaper rate. Investing automatically (hint. Index mutual funds. ETFs. Ones that beat the market consistently. Not active managed funds).

Once I’ve changed my mindset, that $80 umbrella looks pretty good. The venti from Starbucks? Delicious. And tasty (I love the passive aggressive people I meet who disregard this. Depriving themselves of a Starbucks on a daily basis. Or a Lululemon shirt, pants etc. Thinking that shopping at Whole Foods or Farm Boy (the Canadian equivalent of Whole Foods) is expensive (believe me, they pay attention to the product. I remember going to another grocery store to buy their broccoli that was on sale. Worse broccoli ever (you can see it was in poor condition). The one on sale a week later at Farm Boy? Perfect condition. Because the staff cared about the product. And wanted you to get the best one so you wouldn’t waste the food by cutting and throwing away the bad parts into the garbage). Thinking that they’re saving money. You’re not)).

Why? Because I focus on the big wins in my life. Practice an abundance mentality (it drives my friends crazy when I see business opportunities everywhere).

And positivity.

Setbacks? Challenges that can be solved. That’s why there’s this thing called the Internet. Books. Newspapers (you know, it’s the thing you buy that has several sheets of big paper in it). Because there’s knowledge everywhere. It’s up to you to find it. And take action.

B) once a month, I supervise students taking an ESL type exam.

Who are being tested on their reading, listening, writing and speaking skills.

The minute the team I and enter the room, we have a pretty good idea who’s going to pass. And fail. How? By seeing who has a positive mindset (that’s why I love to chat with the clients before their test. You can see who are the positive ones by the way they dress. The way they walk into the exam room before they take their seat (back straight, eyes forward. No hands in their pockets). And by the way they sit in my opinion. Positive people tend to sit straight in their chairs (confidence). Not crouched. They have that special gleam in their eyes. The one that says “Bring it. I’m ready for this exam. I will succeed.”)

Winners in my book.

Oh.

My friend and I are offering a course on mindset and psychology.

To help you succeed when you take these ESL type exams.

What are our qualifications? We have over 10 years experience supervising and leading these types of exams. We know how you feel and we have the psychology tips you need to survive on exam day. Tips that use you can use in your life. To help you do consistent work, day in. Day out.

Keep in mind that we’re working on your mindset and psychology.

Not on the course material (there’s lots of teachers who do this. We’re not one of them).

Besides, if you’ve been spinning your wheels following program after program, it’s time for a coach.

Hit the “Contact” button to book your free 10-15 minute chat call to see if we’re a fit.

That’s it for January.

P.S. Remember, if you have any comments or questions (love, hate etc), it’s faster to tweet them at me (@nickhtang).

P.P.S. My research tip of the day? The best information isn’t found through a Google search. It’s found in databases. The ones at your local city, college or university library.

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