Tag Archives: media and entertainment

Sit back. Grab a coffee. Or protein shake. Your weekend starts now (it’s your week in review on how technology impact on the media and entertainment world)

Happy Thursday!

I hope you had a productive week!

Your time is valuable. And I respect it.

I could post a billion news articles and analyze them one by one, but to be honest with you, everyone else is doing it.

I’d rather focus on one article and give you my short analysis on it (that way, you can get on with your day).

So for this week’s review, I could talk about these articles:

A) Written by Michelle Clancy at RapidTVNews, this article demonstrates that bitcoin is being used to finance the next film (you already know this. And to be honest with you, we’re entering hype bitcoin)

https://www.rapidtvnews.com/2019052856173/mr-marvel-launches-bitcoin-strategy-for-film-financing.html

B) Written by Ellie Silverman at  “The Inquirer” (in summary? QVC is a US TV shopping channel. The original influencer. Notice how tech (YouTube and Instagram influencers) are taking over. Why? Everyone wants to watch it now. And buy the product now. No one has time to scan a TV schedule to see what’s on).

https://www.philly.com/business/qvc-hsn-qurate-retail-group-home-shopping-philadelphia-instagram-influencers-20190529.html?outputType=amp

But I want to talk about this article written by James Vincent at the Verge:

https://www.theverge.com/2019/5/28/18637135/hollywood-ai-film-decision-script-analysis-data-machine-learning

The short summary? It hasn’t been proven that using artificial intelligence will help the movie (or media and entertainment or ad world etc) industry create a better film (think about it -> as you’re reading this post, Avengers Endgame, Aladdin and Pokémon Detective Pikachu are leading the box office right now. Proven franchises that lead to profits. No artificial intelligence was used to create these movies).

An even shorter and faster summary to James’ article?

This tweet from Yves Bergquist (his Twitter handle? @punkstrategy. You should follow him on Twitter. You’ll learn a lot from him):

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Enjoy your Friday and weekend!

See you next Thursday!

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Is it summer or fall yet? Welcome to the weekly media and tech roundup

Happy Thursday!

I hope you’re having an amazing start to summer (if you live in the northern hemisphere) or fall (if you live in the southern hemisphere).

Here’s the one article that impressed me this week when it comes to technology’s impact on the media and entertainment world (it’s written by Ana Nicolaci Da Costa from the BBC):

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-47944276

Let’s break this down/implications:

A) yes, you’re seeing a lot of articles on artificial intelligence. Why? Because no one has figured out how it’ll impact the media/entertainment (or any other field). Everything is a guess at the moment

B) no, artificial intelligence won’t take your job (I assume you’re a human reading my article. If you’re a robot…)

C) in order for artificial intelligence to create X (X = advert/advertising/article/story etc), it needs to access the earlier content. The content that humans have made. Only then can it be used to create new content by splicing and analyzing the data

D) yes, artificial intelligence is a tool. That saves you time. By helping you analyze the data. And giving you options (kind of like those multiple choice exams you had in high school/college/uni. P.S. The answer? It’s always “C” 😉  and

E) from a media and entertainment POV, you’re (the human) always in control of picking (and modifying) the content. Can it give your company an edge? Of course it could. Unless your competitors are using it. Then you’ll have to use a human (and human creativity) to stand out.

Have a great weekend!

I’ll see you next Thursday!

P.S. If you need some more background information, my guests and I talked about this during #AIChat (#AIChat is a monthly Twitter chat on artificial intelligence (AI). You’ll love reading it because there’s two distinct views on how AI will impact the media and entertainment world (I’d take notes if I were you):

https://nickhtang.com/2019/02/22/the-robot-could-be-watching-you/

 

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It’s Thursday! Your Weekend? It Starts Now.

Happy Thursday!

I analyze how technology impacts the media and entertainment industry.

Here are the three articles you need to read so you can stay ahead of your competitors. Or you’ll end getting left behind:

1) from Kyle Wiggers:

https://venturebeat.com/2019/05/14/ibms-ai-achieves-state-of-the-art-broadcast-news-captioning/

Let’s be honest. Everyone says artificial intelligence will become your next news captioner/reporter etc. But as you read the article, you’ll notice that this wasn’t done during a live broadcast.

And if you think about it, a TV news operation still needs human reporters/editors etc to find and edit the stories you see on your local TV newscast.

The winners? The human reporters, editors etc.

2) from Charlene Weisler:

http://weislermedia.blogspot.com/2019/05/how-ai-and-machine-learning-are.html

Charlene’s headline says it all. Focus on her interviewees who talk about sports content. And the lastest GOT (Game of Thrones) coffee cup mistake (and how artificial intelligence can be used in both areas).

3) from Robert Briel:

https://www.broadbandtvnews.com/2019/05/16/netflix-leads-french-svod-market-with-57-3-share/

If you live in France, these numbers should/will scare you. Why? It demonstrates that technology (in this case, Netflix) is disrupting the linear TV and cable world (think about it for a second. Each time you play/stop/pause a program you watch on Netflix, it’s a datapoint for the company to consider).

P.S. Keep in mind that the French subscribers of Netflix are watching US content (and since there’s a lot of it on Netflix) = higher market share.

That’s your Thursday and early weekend round up from me.

See you next Thursday!

Have a great weekend!

 

 

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Media/Tech Roundup

It’s Thursday!

Welcome to the start of your weekend!

Here are the two ways (in my mind) on how technology has impacted the media and entertainment sector this week:

A) from Joe Lemire at “Sporttechie” -> artificial intelligence is getting better at reporting high school sports stories. I’d keep on eye on this. Why? Because as the software gets better, it could/will free up the other human reporters to focus on in-depth investigative stories:
https://www.sporttechie.com/lede-ai-scorestream-partnership-automated-high-school-sports-stories/

P.S. I covered this in an #AIChat in February 2019 with Yves Bergquist (Twitter handle: @punkstrategy) and Peter D. Cathy (Twitter handle:@pcsathy). Consider this supplementary material. The topic? Artificial intelligence, media and technology:
https://nickhtang.com/2019/02/22/the-robot-could-be-watching-you/

B) from Jon Lafayette at “Broadcasting and Cable.” Verizon Media is the perfect example of a media company that is using 5G, AR and extended reality to stand out from the rest. Because if you don’t stand out, no one will want to watch your content:
https://www.broadcastingcable.com/news/verizon-media-takes-shopping-documentary-and-news-to-5g and

C) I have to admit, I’m a fitness addict. My second home is the gym. In case you’re bored and you need a cool fitness routine, take a look at the one Coach Paula (my Sunday personal trainer) created for me last Sunday. It’s guaranteed to make you sweat:
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw34hsPlpBa/

Have a great Friday and weekend!

See you next Thursday!

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) – Your Friend or Foe in the Entertainment Industry?

*** A thank you to Mia Dand, CEO of @LH3.com for editing this article. ***

Artificial intelligence (AI) is currently used in the entertainment industry. Combined with machine learning (ML) it can help networks and others get their content seen by the right people(1). It can also suggest to viewers what to watch next based on their interests. The key? Analyzing the metadata that’s used in the search optimization, ad targeting and recommendations.

How does machine learning help program AI?

By:

  • Using natural language processing to analyze the dialogue in the TV show. To creates a series of themes
  • Analyzing the dialogue between actors helps it and AI examine the mood and personality traits of the main characters which allows consumers to find specific scenes and episodes
  • Gaining a deeper understanding of the video content. An example? The personality traits being displayed by an actor.

For example, Amazon uses AI to analyze scenes, objects and faces. It helps the company figure out what the viewers are clicking on.

When media and entertainment (M&E) businesses use ML, it helps them:

  • build logo and brand recognition and
  • determine how audiences are reacting to the content. The data can be used to market, personalize and stop consumers from switching to another service.

As AI starts using voice search in devices, the pay TV industry uses it to improve the viewer experience. An example? Food Network launching a search capability on Amazon voice enabled devices (Amazon Echo, Echo Dot, Amazon Tap, Amazon Fire TV). The viewer asks the devices about Food Network programs, schedules, recipes and more.

In the advertising world, AI can be used to personalize the content for the customer and advertiser. By using content intelligence, AI can examine what the viewers are watching and when and provides the advertiser a one to one marketing approach to the viewer.

Advertisers should consider AI as their partner that helps them analyze the data to find a fast solution (2). The pros and cons of using AI?

Pros:

  • AI can be used for targeting and helping discover people to target the ads. It includes bidding efficiently for the ads and
  • AI can be used to build B2B sales leads.

Cons:

  • AI can’t answer questions that have a broad answer. For example, it can’t recommend which social media platform to use for an advertising campaign (there’s no consistent measurement across these platforms)
  • AI can’t analyze data from consumer surveys or media consumption data. Media planners need to define the data before AI analyzes it and
  • AI can’t write long ads.

In the film industry, AI helps a movie studio figure out whether or not to make the film by analyzing the screenplay. Or determines the box office potential of a film before it’s released by using a neutral network algorithm to analyze 30 years worth data (box office revenues, film budgets, audience demographics and casting information).

Here are two examples where AI was used to write a short screenplay or scene:

  • an AI named Benjamin wrote the short film Sunspring by examining hundreds of movie scripts from the 80’s and 90’s. This is the first time an entire screenplay has been written by AI.
  • In the film “It’s No Game”, AI was used to write David Hasselhoff’s line. The machine learning algorithm learned to create long sentences based on learning rules from a corpus (composed of dialogue taken from several collections of films and television series) of writing. Another algorithm was used to create short sentences from the words.

AI can automatically create an edited clip that can be sent to another company or given to a human editor to create the final clip. For instance, IBM Watson selected the 10 most usable moments from the horror movie “Morgan.” The human editor created the movie trailer from the clips. This was done in 24 hours instead of taking 10-30 days using a human editor.

As machine learning continues to evolve, media companies can use the technology to create other types of content such as series and movie reviews (AI can find the data from different reviews to see what the critics or consumers are saying about it on social media or online).

AI should be seen as a partner.

Continue reading

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It’s Not About You. It’s About Them

This blog post was born from a Twitter conversation I had with @Vincidia social media team; and Kris Nagel’s video on converting viewers to payers – http://snip.ly/n66c#http://www.vindicia.com/videos/kris-nagel-otttv-summit-converting-viewers-payers/. Thank you for the inspiration! Opinions are my own. 

——-

Some content creators think the content should stand on its own. 
Without any analysis to determine what works. Or doesn’t.

Unfortunately, they continue to live in a dream world or are denying reality. What they’ll soon realize is this. That they don’t have a choice in the matter.

Audiences around the world are fickle. They’re flipping through tv channels (or OTT shows) rapidly. Trying to find something that catches their eye. Something to binge watch for a few hours. It’s hard for anything in the cable/broadcasting/OTT world that catches their attention. Even by creating compelling content, there’s no guarantee that the viewer will tune in.

As a result, in the OTT world, it comes down to ease of use. The recommendations the algorithm spits out after you’ve watched a program. How easy it is to sign up for the service. 

But, what if I wrote that there’s a company who can solve these problems. Without having to sign up new viewers. Who already has a massive built in international audience? Someone who can give out the statistics when a viewer has engaged the content. Who can give the content providers the exact data they need? And, in short, is essentially an OTT?

The company? Facebook.

It’s becoming a video powerhouse. Showing other companies content like Amazon Prime (http://www.engadget.com/2015/06/13/amazon-catastrophe-facebook/) for short periods of time. 

Monetization problem? What monetization problem? Each time a person hits the subscribe button, it gives the company, content creator and advertiser crucial metrics to see who’s watching. And maybe allow the content creator enough time to adjust the plot in future episodes to target their demographic to maximize the affect on the audience.
Of course Facebook continues to add people at a rapid pace. So it does have an advantage when it comes to getting the biggest audience. And companies such as the Discovery Channel have figured out how to use it for short bursts of time (http://variety.com/2015/tv/news/discovery-facebook-president-obama-1201518830/) to promote their product or partner with it for social causes. Without compromising their own cable or OTT channels. 
But what happens when FB finally decides to produce its own programming? Shutting out others as they tweak their algorithm to favor their own content? Will organizations like the EU accuse it of anti-competitive practices? 

How will the dynamics of the industry change? The strongest (Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime) will survive. The others? Maybe. If they focus on their niche. And manage to grow their audience over time. 

FB? I predict it’ll do very well if it decides to produce its own programming/content. With its massive reach, the ability to determine who is viewing the content (and when), the company is virtually unstoppable. It can offer exactly what the advertiser needs, especially in the growing baby boomer and above demographics. The ones who have the money. And are continuing to log into the service and stay for hours at a time.

A possible solution to a content provider. Without having to go the OTT route.

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Sports Broadcasting – Broadcasting via the Net, not TV

Sports is essential in the broadcasting world.

Where else would you pay a lot of money for an event that is broadcasted live, captures a certain demographic and, when recorded, diminishes it’s impact? 

On the other hand, leagues like the NFL realize that the audience is increasingly viewing their product online or via mobile devices.

Which makes this decision brave (and curious):

https://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2015/06/06/yahoo-deal-with-nfl-sign-things-come/y5SFp0TTL36DWdspVvM5nK/story.html

Signing with Yahoo (who paid a pittance of $20 million to the NFL IMHO) while gaining a potential audience of 1 billion (Yahoo) is a great sign that the NFL gets it. And that they want to exploit this audience. On the other hand, it’ll be interesting to see two things:

a) whether or not the vertically integrated telcos/cable (content and pipes) will start bidding even more to keep these rights or

b) if Yahoo et al combine with ‘a’ as a supplement  (eg: broadcasting games on a certain day/period).

Personally, I’d like to see another route -> an Internet company grabbing the entire rights. Then having the telcos/cable companies bid for certain parts. 

Not only will you get the best of both worlds (mobile audience) and linear TV/cable, but everyone would be happy (niche advertising, audience demographics).

The future – sooner, rather than later.

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